Glimpses of grace seen in the everyday

Posts tagged ‘God’s power’

Awesome! Or is it?

A computer game that my husband and I enjoy has an irritating habit of describing our every success as “Awesome!”  This word seems to be the current version of what what used to be neat, cool, or groovy (hate that one!).  But wait a minute!  What is really awesome? 

Awe:  an overwhelming feeling of reverence, admiration, fear, etc., produced by that which is grand, sublime, extremely powerful, or the like.  (Dictionary definition)

From this word comes “awesome,” which should describe things that produce that feeling of awe.  Truly awesome things leave us speechless, weak-kneed, overwhelmed by a grandeur far beyond the ordinary, beyond human comprehension.  My husband uses “awe” to describe the feeling he had when he first saw the Grand Canyon.  It’s how I feel when viewing a particularly beautiful sunset.  When examining the intricate detail of a flower.  Or even when watching the miracle of a huge jetliner soaring gracefully through the sky. It’s other-worldly, evidence of Someone far wiser and more powerful than we are who is showing us a taste of super-human majesty.

If we dumb down the word “awesome” to a mere expression of approval (e.g. the taste of your sandwich), what other word is left to express the feeling inspired by God’s wonderful works that bedazzle our eyes, minds, and imagination?  Or do we have our eyes so glued to our mirrors, menus, and manmade gadgets that we no longer lift them up to see what is truly awesome? 

Click below to enjoy a stirring rendition of “Our God is an Awesome God”—with pictures of His breathtaking creation.  NOW, THIS IS REALLY AWESOME!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaU6EMR37NA

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Worthy of My Worship

Infinitely high and holy, yet not remote. 
Intimate, yet demanding reverence. 
Self-revealing, yet beyond comprehension.

Galaxy & DNA

No matter how much we study and learn about God, it is just the tip of the iceberg.  This is the God whose universe extends way beyond the visible universe 14 billion light years beyond us.  (See the link in my previous post.)  No matter how powerful a telescope or microscope could be made, we could never approach the limit of God’s incredible creation.  Here’s a beautiful description of His greatness:

Oh, the depth of the riches of the wisdom and knowledge of God!
How unsearchable his judgments,
   and his paths beyond tracing out!
Who has known the mind of the Lord?
Or who has been his counselor?”
Who has ever given to God,
   that God should repay him?”
For from him and through him and to him are all things.
To him be the glory forever! Amen.
  (Romans 11:33-36)

And yet we see this same God becoming a newborn baby in a feeding trough—and later publicly executed as a criminal—to win our hearts and make a way for us to be with Him forever! 

I am delighted to love and serve a God who is so great I could never wrap my mind around him—but whom I can embrace with my whole being as I feel His arms around me.  What a wonderful mystery!

Divine Irony

Job is a drama in at least three acts.  An irony where poor Job, as well as his friends, are totally oblivious of the real drama behind the scenes.

First (after Job is introduced), Satan shows up in God’s throne room and makes a bet with God that he can make Job sin.  God consents, confident that his model child, will not fail.  (I wonder, would God bet on me?) 

Then the curtains close on the heavenly stage and our attention is redirected to the earthly stage where Job is hit with one tragedy after another.  He endures days and nights of grief and suffering along with wave after wave of harangue from his so-called “friends.”  Everyone is sure that they are right, and here’s why:

1.  Job’s perspective:  a)  He knows he hasn’t sinned.  b)  Good people are not supposed to suffer.  c)  God is in control of all that happens.

Job’s conclusion:  God is being unjust, so Job desperately seeks an audience with Him.

2.  Job’s friends’ perspective:  a) Job is suffering.  b) Suffering is always the punishment for sin, just as prosperity is always the reward for righteousness.  c)  God is just.

Their conclusion:  Job has sinned and needs to repent.

3.  God’s perspective:  a)  Job is the model of righteousness.  b) God is both just and wise, but not limited to human standards.  c) His purpose is beyond the knowledge of  the humans.  Then in chapters 38-41, God blows them all away from a whirlwind with a tour of His magnificent power in creation.  No answers for the questions they asked–just He Himself!!! 

In the third main part of this drama, Job gets the prize!  He has endured and won.  He receives restored health, double his original wealth, and another whole family, including 3 gorgeous daughters. 

But most of all, God is vindicated. 

How can this story help me when I look at what’s happening to me, those I care about, my nation, and the world around me?  In Job’s darkness, his expression of hope shines all the brighter:

But he knows the way that I take;
when he has tested me, I will come forth as gold.  (23:10)   Rainbow

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